Ubuntu & Kubuntu 11.10 Review | LAS | s19e01

Ubuntu & Kubuntu 11.10 Review | LAS | s19e01

Fresh off the mirrors we load up Ubuntu and Kubuntu 11.1 and give you our review for both in this ACTION packed episode!

Plus – We observe the passing of a industry legend, help boost your memory, and give you our take on Richard Stallman’s Steve Jobs comments!

All this week on, The Linux Action Show!

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News:
Kubuntu & Ubuntu 11.10 Review:
  • Ubuntu 11.10 Finds it self in a hard spot. The steady, and very needed improvements in Unity cost them in overall “on the box” bullet points for Ubuntu. Overall, the end result of this release is something that feels much better built than 11.04 did, but there’s no buzz term for you to hang that hat on.
  • Chris suspects this could be an ongoing perception issue for Ubuntu. They have additional work to do on Unity, and that will undoubtly take a great deal of their developer focus. This meas other fancy buzz features might get missed.
  • Perhaps Ubuntu could name, Unity releases. “Ubuntu 12.04 featuring Unity 3”. Then they could focus on all the improvements in that version of Unity that ships with that Ubuntu release.
  • Linux 3.0
  • Gnome 3.2

Ubuntu 11.10

Kubuntu 11.10

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42 Responses to “Ubuntu & Kubuntu 11.10 Review | LAS | s19e01”

  1. asedsa Says:

    Describing hiding the Menu options in Ubuntu as feeling like a “hack” is perfect. I’ve been trying to think of a way to describe the fact it just *feels* wrong for some reason but I could never put it in words. I’m happy to know it wasn’t just me. It just doesn’t work. 

  2. CozzyB Says:

    Ubuntu 11.10 32bit refuses to install on my pc but the 64bit install, had video driver issues with 64 though, so both have issues with my pc.

  3. martin milev Says:

    I am using 10inch netbook.
    At the moment I stick with Gnome 3, but I think that Unity is the best Ubuntu netbook remix.
    When its good on the 10inch it must be sucking balls on 20inch screen.
    I think that Ubuntu is approching for laptop market mainly. You can see it on the Ubuntu webpage, with this 13inch Dell Latitude saying (in a orange bubble) ” My Ubuntu is faster than a Windows…blabla “.

  4. Scott Wears Says:

    Im downloading the virtualbox  So i can leave it on to sead I get 5 meg up so I hope that helps
    My pc is on 24/7 :) anything to support you guys and the effort of the community

  5. Fenix Kane Says:

    I played with Unity in 11.04 for about a day and concluded that it wasn’t ready. Immediately switched back to the Gnome Fallback option. Now I’ve moved to 11.10, and I’ve got to say that it’s definitely usable. I was able to modify most of the things that didn’t sit perfectly with me (a lot of it is in compizconfig) and I think I’m going to stick with it.
    However my gripes are 1: The Global Menu hiding crap you all talked about. There is no option ANYWHERE I can find to make those stay around. 2: In the dash, right clicking behaves like a left click. That sucks. I need to be able to get some context menus on some of that stuff. Those are really the two biggest issues I’m having with it.
    I think I’m going to stick with it. I think with one more release it’ll have most of these things figured out and will be ready for Prime-Time.
    One thing you guys didn’t mention but I feel is HUGE is true Multi-Arch support. I have a few programs that just don’t work with the ia32 libs, but now they work with this new feature. So if you wanted a feature that you could put up as a bullet point, this was it.

  6. Gentoo4Life Says:

    One of the things you guys needed to mention when bashing Kubuntu for being so “stock” KDE without all the bells and whistles is the fact that all the *buntus must fit on a CD.  When you have a limit of 700MB, you really are limited in what you can add to the Gnome and KDE variants.

  7. Jeffrey Paxton Says:

    I like the new unity interface. Coming from a Mac, I’m comfortable with the global menus. I don’t mind that they are hidden because — as a power user — I can navigate with keyboard shortcuts. A global menubar is a problem for multi-window applications but no application should be multi-window (hint hint Gimp). It would also be a problem for novice users as nothing indicates that the menubar is hidden in the top panel. It does help keep the experience clean and elegant and I’m all about form over function.

    The first thing I do with a new installation of ubuntu is install the Feanza Icon theme. I couldn’t change the icon set in unity without the gnome-tweak-tool which was a bit annoying.

    I don’t like the unified message menu. I’m not a heavy user of twitter or IM and if I where I don’t think I’d want all notifications in one menu. I’d like to see separate indicator applets for empathy, gwibber, email, etc. What I’d like to see is a message indicator that actually indicates when I have email. Oh, the little message icon lights up if I actually go to the trouble of opening Thunderbird first but that kind of defeats the purpose. Maybe there should be a thundrbird-daemon or something.

    One final thought. The wireless on my laptop slowed to the point where it was unusable after an upgrade to 11.10. After hours of trouble shooting and finally starting a thread at ubuntuforums.com I found that a bug stops 11.10 from playing with 802.11N very well (thanks go to the good folks at ubuntuforums for their help). So I switched my AP from N to G and all is well.

    Good show guys (^_^)

  8. Guest Says:

    Ubuntu 11.10 has been a really bad experience so far. Unity is still really buggy and even if all bugs would be fixed it wouldn’t be my desktop of choice. GNOME 3 feels just way more better. To me Unity feels really complicated and cluttered.

    The first bug I noticed happened accidentally. I opened Nautilus, clicked wallpaper with a left mouse button and pressed CTRL-T -> it opens a new tab to backround, not into Nautilus.

    ALT-F2. Type “gnome-doc” to launch gnome-doc application. Press mouse left button on “gnome” part and it shows graphicals glitches.

    Sometimes Compiz simple grashes when I try to start application with ALT-F2. First freezes and after some time restarts itself.

    GNOME 3 integration is really bad. “Online Accounts” does mostly nothing on Ubuntu and it lacks of many other nice features like Sushi.

    Global menu performance is bad and hard to use especially with application which uses multiple windows like GIMP, Dia, etc.

    There’s so much to complain (Mutter > Compiz, performance problems, etc) but I think this is enough for now.

    Well, overall I’m really disappointed especially because Ubuntu is the face of Linux. Ubuntu 11.04 and 11.10 are really buggy and bad experiences (at least for me) and I’m afraid they doesn’t give a nice picture of Linux at all. Distributions with GNOME 3 (Fedora, openSUSE, …) has been stable and much more comfortable to use from even since alpha GNOME 3.0 state.

    I really hope Ubuntu 12.04 will be finally at least stable release and I believe it will happen. Unfortunately in FOSS world the only way to get enough testing is force technologies throught users throat [1].

    [1] https://luke.faraone.cc/blog/2011/05/your-release-sucks/
        http://linuxfr.org/nodes/86687/comments/1249943

    Canonical work for upstream makes me sad. I really hope Canonical doesn’t start yet another downstream project for KDE 4 menus. They have to learn work with upstream. Drop bunch of code to community and run away is not nice/proper way to do it.
    Being a stock/upstream version of Desktop environment is not a bad thing at all (like you critized Kubuntu). It’s really worrying if distributions would start to work more downstream projects. Just look how much Canonical waste resources to maintain their downstream patches at the moment. Porting Unity to other distribtions is a painful job (yes, porting Ubuntu applications to Linux) [2]. Is this what you really want? Imagine if Fedora guys would start to develop only for Fedora [3]; other distributions would be in huge trouble. We are lucky that Fedora is about upstream [4].

    [2] http://lizards.opensuse.org/2011/02/15/abandoning-unity-for-the-time-being/
    [3] http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Red_Hat_contributions
    [4] http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Staying_close_to_upstream_projects

    Here is another Unity review: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BKiC3geDCc

    —–

    To see where GNOME is heading makes me really happy.

    https://github.com/gnome-design-team/gnome-mockups

    —–

    Libre Office on browser looks really interesting. Of course it is possible to run other application in browser as well. Thanks to Alexander Larsson (Fedora/Red Hat) to make it possible.

    http://blogs.gnome.org/alexl/2010/11/23/gtk3-vs-html5/
    http://git.gnome.org/browse/gtk+/log/?h=broadway

  9. Guest Says:

    Ubuntu 11.10 has been a really bad experience so far. Unity is still really buggy and even if all bugs would be fixed it wouldn’t be my desktop of choice. GNOME 3 feels just way more better. To me Unity feels really complicated and cluttered.

    The first bug I noticed happened accidentally. I opened Nautilus, clicked wallpaper with a left mouse button and pressed CTRL-T -> it opens a new tab to backround, not into Nautilus.

    ALT-F2. Type “gnome-doc” to launch gnome-doc application. Press mouse left button on “gnome” part and it shows graphicals glitches.

    Sometimes Compiz simple grashes when I try to start application with ALT-F2. First freezes and after some time restarts itself.

    GNOME 3 integration is really bad. “Online Accounts” does mostly nothing on Ubuntu and it lacks of many other nice features like Sushi.

    Global menu performance is bad and hard to use especially with application which uses multiple windows like GIMP, Dia, etc.

    There’s so much to complain (Mutter > Compiz, performance problems, etc) but I think this is enough for now.

    Well, overall I’m really disappointed especially because Ubuntu is the face of Linux. Ubuntu 11.04 and 11.10 are really buggy and bad experiences (at least for me) and I’m afraid they doesn’t give a nice picture of Linux at all. Distributions with GNOME 3 (Fedora, openSUSE, …) has been stable and much more comfortable to use from even since alpha GNOME 3.0 state.

    I really hope Ubuntu 12.04 will be finally at least stable release and I believe it will happen. Unfortunately in FOSS world the only way to get enough testing is force technologies throught users throat [1].

    [1] https://luke.faraone.cc/blog/2011/05/your-release-sucks/
        http://linuxfr.org/nodes/86687/comments/1249943

    Canonical work for upstream makes me sad. I really hope Canonical doesn’t start yet another downstream project for KDE 4 menus. They have to learn work with upstream. Drop bunch of code to community and run away is not nice/proper way to do it.
    Being a stock/upstream version of Desktop environment is not a bad thing at all (like you critized Kubuntu). It’s really worrying if distributions would start to work more downstream projects. Just look how much Canonical waste resources to maintain their downstream patches at the moment. Porting Unity to other distribtions is a painful job (yes, porting Ubuntu applications to Linux) [2]. Is this what you really want? Imagine if Fedora guys would start to develop only for Fedora [3]; other distributions would be in huge trouble. We are lucky that Fedora is about upstream [4].

    [2] http://lizards.opensuse.org/2011/02/15/abandoning-unity-for-the-time-being/
    [3] http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Red_Hat_contributions
    [4] http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Staying_close_to_upstream_projects

    Here is another Unity review: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BKiC3geDCc

    —–

    To see where GNOME is heading makes me really happy.

    https://github.com/gnome-design-team/gnome-mockups

    —–

    Libre Office on browser looks really interesting. Of course it is possible to run other application in browser as well. Thanks to Alexander Larsson (Fedora/Red Hat) to make it possible.

    http://blogs.gnome.org/alexl/2010/11/23/gtk3-vs-html5/
    http://git.gnome.org/browse/gtk+/log/?h=broadway

  10. Anonymous Says:

    I agree with the comments on KDE. 4.7.x is a great series. In my opinion it’s better and more useful than GNOME3/Unity. The folder content previews are something that i particularly enjoy. 
    It’s funny that I’ve never met anyone who likes the Kickoff menu. If you right click on the menu, you can enable the ‘classic menu’. 

    I tried Ubuntu 11.10 – i still don’t like Unity. I don’t like the way you have to search for the programs to launch them. It’s too slow. I prefer the menu system. If you do anything a little resource intensive – the entire UI slows like a MOFO. 

  11. Kevinspencer33 Says:

    I tried Ubuntu 11.10 inside VirtualBOx, and I had a lot of weird problems:

    gnome-language-selector don’t work,
    you can’t change language in the login screen,
    you can’t install lmms, 
    if you install gnome shell the menu appear below the gnome bar,
    etc…

  12. Mangolok1426 Says:

    chrislas to have the best experience with unity use the way it was meant to be used with all windows full screen and make use of expo to distribute your windows across many desktops,you will be amazed how productive you become with every thing else out of your way.also make use of their amazing desktop shortcuts and unity settings (very stable) to reduce the opacity of the launcher and panel if you wish and togggle backlight and give it another 2 days,i think you will reconsider,yes still lots of work to do but it is right direction and will save gnome from the pain of gnome 3 .kde 4.7 is great ,i ve installed it alongside unity because it is the most stable ad most mature among the different environments,still hate the kickoff menu and the (mint menu),also for some reason kde handle the wireless connections more efficiently than gnome .Allan the world is changing canonical can’t sit by idly when windows and  mac are changing,all in all a very good and enjoyable show keep it rolling,that one we don’ want to change.

  13. Biomechanica Says:

    For me, it feels like Ubuntu (or even Linux distros in general) with the Unity interface are chasing after age old idea’s that have already been implemented in more popular Operating Systems years and years before. Innovation on the desktop, I think, has been rather stagnant since the introduction of the personal computer. People/Companies have just prettied up the same old layout, added little features here and there and called it “awesome new interface!”. I think that the Open Source world (not just linux) have an incredible opportunity to band together and build something truly innovative. Unity, in my opinion, is not that innovation and neither are any of the desktops on Linux distro’s or the *BSD’s. 

    Unity is basically chasing after it’s competitor’s (if you can even call them that) features and mashing them into one desktop (and not doing a very good job of it). It is buggy, not complete and very confusing for, not just new users, but students who want to get stuff done. Finding something on Unity almost requires prior knowledge of application names. Even if it were implemented (perhaps it is already) that you can search “music app”, most users won’t know to do that. 

    Now, I think it’s important to note that I absolutely love Linux and it’s ecosystem and want nothing more than to see it thrive, not just for servers, but user’s needs and wants also. I run my main desktop on FreeBSD (9.0 BETA3!) and run Ubuntu on my laptop. I got so frustrated by Canonical trying to please me as a user with this Unity stuff (same goes for Gnome 3.2) that I sucked it up and decided to put my ‘power-user’ helmet on and go with XMonad as my desktop. No, it’s not ideal for users, but for a *nix person like me or many of the people on this site, it’s nice to have a fall back to our skills to please our needs (open source working it’s magic).

    So, until there is something really magical for the user in regards to the Linux/*BSD/Open source OS’s desktop, there will not be much change, and I will stay with XMonad.

    -There lacks vision in these parts.

  14. Walker Says:

    Allan & Bryan would be interesting duo…

  15. adi7519 Says:

    I would love an arch linux review with alan jude!

  16. Minimiki Says:

    KDE4.7 is a great desktop environment but kubuntu is the last distro i would use it with… 
    Kickoff is crap luckily there is a great replacement for it called Lancelot
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ts3XKqtsg-8&feature=related
    How about talking a bit about Plasma Active One in the next episode :)

  17. Anonymous Says:

    That’s a solid idea! Pacman vs ports! 😉

    -Chris

  18. Anonymous Says:

    I’ve been corrected that Ubuntu One and Déjà Vu backup can be used together, so strike that from my review.

    We’ll cover some errata next week!
    -Chris

  19. Mirza Dervišević Says:

    Long time KDE and Kubuntu user here (since 7.04).
    You need to understand that Kubuntu is not Ubuntu (http://apachelog.wordpress.com/2010/03/17/kubuntu-is-not-ubuntu/)

    Of 6 council members for Kubuntu only 1 is working for Canonical. Kubuntu is mostly community driven project. Kubuntu is indeed a third class citizen in Canonical, often called blue headed stepchild.

    But I still love it, I really do. I love the stability and freashness of KDE packages backed up by a stable Ubuntu backend and huge amount of repositories.

    Don’t get me wrong I agree with all that you said about Kubuntu, you are rally one of the rare reviewers that tries to be objective, even if somewhat emotional 😀

    Kubuntu is what ever you make out of it.

  20. Dhoore Alexander Says:

    Happily using Xubuntu!

  21. Dhoore Alexander Says:

    Happily using Xubuntu!

  22. Flimm Says:

    It’s 11.10, not 11.1 (in the description).

  23. Olav Says:

    Covering errata after every “review-show” would be great. It’s fair to projects and gives community a change to participants to make LAS better.

  24. Osama Says:

    Give me a break, you an asshole, you think he was bad mouthing Steve Jobs? Do you ever know what and where he said that? No, you won’t be sitting on this show when RMS passes away, you will be sitting in some dirtbag sniffin cocain.

  25. Louis Tim Larsen Says:

    If you set the launcher to “never hide” in CompizConfig Settings Manager it just makes your expericence much better.
    I really hate to work with minimized apps so that I can see some of my desktop. I just waste of space and I also when the launcher is not always visible. Another reason why I don’t like OS X.

    If you want to work with more terminals at a time I’ll recommend you to take a look at Transmission 😉

  26. Sean Says:

    I think of it as money, $11.1 and $11.10 is the same but in software world, I guess its not the same.

  27. Chiphead Says:

    I’ve been using Ubuntu since I discovered Ubuntu 6.10.  When Ubuntu 11.04 Alpha’s started coming out, the word hit the ‘net that you couldn’t use the cube and the menu was gone. I almost gave up on Ubuntu.  I looked at Kubuntu and Linux Mint.  Neither of them gave me the “feel” that Ubuntu had prior to Unity.  I didn’t know what to do.  It was like a huge falling out between me and the people making Ubuntu.
     
    Then I said to my wife,  “If Canonical doesn’t fix this by 11.10, I bet the users will come up with some kind of a patch or something that will bring back the menu and the cube.” So I stayed with Ubuntu.  In 11.04 I used the classic mode so I could have my cube and menu.

    I was customizing my desktop and had just installed Cairo Dock.  I realized that to have a menu in Unity you could just run Cairo Dock and use the built in menu that it comes with.  So that just left the cube.  When the Beta of 11.10 came out I saw a youtube video showing Ubuntu 11.10 running in Unity with the wobbly windows, “aero snap”, and the cube, all enabled.  I installed the beta and sure enough, within no time, I had it setup with the cube running in 11.10 Unity 3D. With Cairo Dock installed,  I had a menu and the cube.

    Just as I predicted the users have come through on fixes for the menu.

    “Use Classic Gome2 Panel With Unity”. (For 11.04)
    http://joesteiger.com/2011/09/13/use-gnome2-panel-with-unity/, for 11.04. 

    “Get Classic Start Menu In Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot”.
    http://www.addictivetips.com/ubuntu-linux-tips/get-classic-start-menu-in-ubuntu-11-10-oneiric-ocelot/

    Canonical has surprised me with some of their choices.  With 11.04 I almost threw up my hands in disgust.  However 11.10 has smoothed things over for me.  No OS is perfect. For me 11.10 is the best thing going.  I just hope that 12.04 has more customization options, such as being able to move the launcher.

    Chiphead
    http://whatchipheadthinks.blogspot.com/

  28. Geprouser Says:

    The Linux Action Show has reviewed the more popular (and somewhat newbie friendly) Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Fedora, Mint and OpenSUSE in the past.Can you review the more advanced Linux distributions like Slackware, Gentoo and LFS for people who are currently using one of the easier distributions and are looking to try out something more advanced but aren’t sure where to start?p.s.I didn’t mention Arch (even though it is a more advanced distribution) because it has already been reviewed on the show.

  29. Anonymous Says:

    I’ve been a KDE user since KDE 1.0 beta in SuSE 5.3, released in September of 1998.   I am currently running Kubuntu 10.04, which uses KDE 4.5.3,  because it is an LTS and I’ll stay with it until the 12.04 LTS goes gold. 

    In my experience, Kubuntu has become the most powerful desktop that I have ever used, and that includes ALL versions of Windows.   By powerful I mean that I can do more stuff with less typing and fewer mouse clicks in KDE than any other DE.   KDE just seems to “know” what I want to do and generally offers the option that I want to use.   After I install it the first thing I do is switch to the “Classic” menu style.  It hides less desktop and works much faster.   I then configure Dolphin and activate essentially ALL of its features.    Dolphin is the most powerful part of KDE, and the tool used most often, followed by SystemSettings.      I prefer the “locate” command so I disable the KDE search functions.   I install wicd and completely remove KNetworkManager.  Then I install my HP duplex printer.   I install FireFox, LibraOffice, PostgreSQL and Pgadmin3, Blink, Ekiga, GoogleEarth, Stellarium and the SAGE math engine, plus a variety of other science and math apps.   Then I install the QuickLaunch widget and drop all my most used app icons into it.    After that I drop the yaWP Weather Widget on my desktop, along with a CPU temp widget and a Network traffic widget.   I install UbuntuOne from the repository.  Running it linked to my UbuntuOne account and registered my notebook.   After that, every file I drop into my “Ubuntu One” directory soon appears on the cloud, and every file I drop into the cloud appears in my directory, and I don’t have to run the UbuntuOne app after that.    I install Nautilus in order to connect to DropBox, but both work equally well.

    If you’ve are thinking about installing Kubuntu, or have and need some help, go over to the http://www.kubuntuforums.net and ask away.  Questions about Windows, especially as it relates to Kubuntu/Linux, as also welcome.

  30. Jordan Says:

    I’m curious about the bug that chris got during the show. I’m getting the same exact bug in Unity 3d. If I open firefox for example; I can’t see the window. Unity 2d is working great and I’m liking it more and more. I do feel that we should be able to tweak it more (ex turn the window button hiding off in the global menubar etc.) This bug is driving me nuts tho. Is anyone else having this problem? 3d acceleration is all enabled and the Oracle display driver is installed. All updates are done to Ubuntu and Virtualbox.

  31. Flimm Says:

    No, it’s definitely not the same. Most version numbers for most pieces of software treat each number individually, so that 1.4 < 1.10. This is best practise in the Debian, Ubuntu, GNOME and Python communities, to name four.

    For Ubuntu, it's additionally significant because the first number of 11.10 matches the year it was released (2011) and the month (October or 10).

    It's mistake that a lot of people make, but it's important to get version numbers right, because sometimes there exists both a 11.1 and a 11.10, among other things. Otherwise I would let it slide :)

  32. jgm Says:

    Isn’t that an arbitrary, self-imposed limitation though?

  33. jgm Says:

    Have you thought about testing the waters beyond Ubuntu? If you’ve been using that long, you might be ready to kick its “training wheels” off and stretch out a bit….

  34. jgm Says:

    I’ve heard of non-censored comments sections, but this is just ridiculous.

  35. Olav Says:

    They seem to have quite nice improvements coming. Couple of examples:

    1) https://github.com/gnome-design-team/gnome-mockups/raw/master/shell/touch-enabled-alternatives.png
    2) https://github.com/gnome-design-team/gnome-mockups/raw/master/system-settings/network/network-panel-summary.png
    3) https://github.com/gnome-design-team/gnome-mockups/raw/master/system-settings/power/power.png
    4) https://github.com/gnome-design-team

    … and people says Fedora guys doesn’t care desktop/usability, *sigh*

  36. Steffinger1 Says:

    It would be great if you could do an episode about women in linux/opensource someday. I read that gnome is making some effort bringing women into opensource development as you can see here:
    https://live.gnome.org/GnomeWomen/OutreachProgram2011
    and the result you can is something like this:
    http://tamara.softver.org.mk/?p=137

    I personally don’t know any women involved with open source. What about you? Are women important for linux? What is your opinion on this?

  37. Mick Vernon Says:

    These doofi are nauseating. Wanted to hear the Linux review but I can’t sit through it. Out

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  39. Thestrangeguest Says:

    I’m NOT coming from Windows. I’m coming from Mac OS, switched then to Ubuntu. Have been an Ubuntu user ever since. However, I can’t get productive with Unity. I really wanted to like it. I gave it a chance, kept it for months on my computer, learned the shortcuts, etc. But I came to the conclusion that it’s crap. If the desktop environment slows down your work instead of speeding it up, then something is wrong.

    The funny thing is, that I tried Windows 7 lately. And even though many Linux users hate Windows (I didn’t like it too before), I have to admit that Windows 7 is a really good OS. Especially the GUI is just very well elaborated, with great usability. So I understand very well, why Kubuntu is so appealing to potential Linux users coming from Windows. KDE is simply more intuitive than Unity.

    Whilst there are some nice approaches with Unity (e.g. Global Menu), at the same time it’s just messed up the way it’s been done by Canonical. Why, oh why, for instance, does the Global Menu auto-hide? It’s just more tedious. I want to “aim & click”, not “hover & aim & click”. It’s also a pain to switch between tasks when you’re a lazy mouse user. I don’t want to be forced to use shortcuts and put my other hand on the keyboard all the time. Especially when you’re a laptop user, this really sucks a lot.

    Also, the Dash is pretty much useless the way it is now. It saves screen space, yes. But it doesn’t help to be productive. I can click on an icon to launch an application or to bring it to front. But why can’t I click it, for example, in order to minimize the application? This is just one example of all the little details that make Unity get in your way of being productive. Unity increases the time you need to navigate around between your tasks. Using Kubuntu, I can save (almost) just as much screen space by simply configuring the task bar to auto-hide or allowing it to be covered by full screen applications. That way, I still have a task bar at my fingertips, while Unity doesn’t provide anything for easy task switching with your mouse. You cannot minimize a window in Unity by quickly clicking on it’s icon in the task bar – because there is no task bar. And clicking on the icon in the Dash does not minimize it, nor is navigating to the dash as quick as using a task bar. The only “advantage” of Unity is saving the space that is being saved by using a global menu. But the way the global menu has been implemented, brings more disadvantage than advantage.

    In Unity, closing an application by using its window button “Close” is a pain in the arse. Fitt’s Law is totally perverted, because I still have to aim for that button. Because if I move my mouse to the very top and click, then the Close button is not clicked, as it doesn’t fill the area to the full top. So stupid. Not even the obvious things are being dealt with by Canonical. In KDE, I just throw the mouse button the the very top right corner and click. So fast and intuitive.

    And who the hell had the idea to make such a thin scrollbar crap in the scope/lenses menu? It’s almost impossible to grab that. Talking about scrollbars: The overlay scrollbars are also the biggest horseshit I’ve ever used. It just gets in your way, needs more time. You have to hover/aim before you can grab it. And there’s not even an option to disable it in the settings. Again, you need an external tweak to do this. Sucks, sucks, sucks.

    And so, I am likely to switch to Kubuntu. Tried the KDE desktop and love it. Funnily, I love it exactly because it is very much like Windows 7 as for the usability. And I say this, even though I tried Windows 7 just for a few hours, as well as KDE.

    But yes, for those who need Ubuntu One extensively, there is no Ubuntu One client (yet) for KDE. That’s the only thing that’s missing.

  40. yuye Says:

    その中のMBT ブーツサッカースパイクの綿入れの靴は大麻の糸、アディダス スパイク サッカーあや絹、薄い絹織物、錦などの織物の布の合成を縫う靴でです。漢は多く分けて形をつくことが現れるかに代わって、底は麻糸で編んで、またユニフォーム 通販2の先が方履を上げると語っています;魏晋の時期に、流行ってい靴の先端で両けネイティブ フィッツシモンズものの刺青
    トリーバーチ シューズを刺繍します。破棄する時、ニューバランス下駄が1種になるのは流行して、それはぼうっとする歯の靴があるので、扁、学部、歯の3から一部は構成します。 皮革、綿のフェルトなどの製造する革靴、革靴はまた“乗馬靴”あるいは“高統の長靴”を語って、もとは北方の遊牧民族のために着て、長靴、革靴、フェルト製靴、単靴、綿の長靴、雲の長靴、トリーバーチ 店舗ガチョウを使って長靴のなどの分けることを突く日照りのナイキ バスケシューズ 長靴があります。ネイティブ フィッツシモンズ孫ヒンが長靴の始祖だと伝えられて、南北朝の時期は北方で広範に流行っていて、そして江南まで(へ)伝わって、唐代已官(至って明清やっと朝廷に命令を下された庶民が長靴を着ることを禁止する、官の官吏だけ長靴を着ることができる)に着いたどうにか全て。

  41. yuye Says:

    その中のMBT ブーツサッカースパイクの綿入れの靴は大麻の糸、アディダス スパイク サッカーあや絹、薄い絹織物、錦などの織物の布の合成を縫う靴でです。漢は多く分けて形をつくことが現れるかに代わって、底は麻糸で編んで、またユニフォーム 通販2の先が方履を上げると語っています;魏晋の時期に、流行ってい靴の先端で両けネイティブ フィッツシモンズものの刺青
    トリーバーチ シューズを刺繍します。破棄する時、ニューバランス下駄が1種になるのは流行して、それはぼうっとする歯の靴があるので、扁、学部、歯の3から一部は構成します。 皮革、綿のフェルトなどの製造する革靴、革靴はまた“乗馬靴”あるいは“高統の長靴”を語って、もとは北方の遊牧民族のために着て、長靴、革靴、フェルト製靴、単靴、綿の長靴、雲の長靴、トリーバーチ 店舗ガチョウを使って長靴のなどの分けることを突く日照りのナイキ バスケシューズ 長靴があります。ネイティブ フィッツシモンズ孫ヒンが長靴の始祖だと伝えられて、南北朝の時期は北方で広範に流行っていて、そして江南まで(へ)伝わって、唐代已官(至って明清やっと朝廷に命令を下された庶民が長靴を着ることを禁止する、官の官吏だけ長靴を着ることができる)に着いたどうにか全て。

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