Fragmentation Timebomb | LUP 39

Fragmentation Timebomb | LUP 39

In the not too distant future the Linux desktop will face a landscape comprised of users running Wayland, Mir, and X11. Ubuntu will be rolling out their first generation Qt based desktop environment, and developers are crying fragmentation.

But how would we shape the future if we could wave a magic wand? And is fragmentation a real problem in practice?

Plus: Our thoughts on Magea, producing video content on Linux, and much more!

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Show Notes:

FU:

Fragmentation Challenges

  • Two big ways to look at this, the core, and the desktop.

Linux distributions are also unified at the core library level. In addition to the kernel, you have projects like X.org, glibc, gstreamer, Gnome, QT, webkit, CUPS, clutter, etc. These are all example of core libraries that generally are included in almost every variant of mobile Linux; Chrome, Android, MeeGo, WebOS, LiMo, etc. They all use these same “base” components.

Bird gave a thought-provoking talk with a conclusion that will probably surprise some: he thinks a “good” fork of the kernel is the right approach to meld Linux and the “Internet of Things”.

Ubuntu Challange:

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