Will Flash Be Trashed? | LUP 101

Will Flash Be Trashed? | LUP 101

A renewed push to kill flash hits the web & we discuss the possible advantages for Linux users. A KDE user trying out Gnome for a week & the real issues he touches on.

Plus your take on openSUSE’s big changes & follow up to our take on it.

Thanks to:

Ting


DigitalOcean


Linux Academy

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Show Notes:

Catch Up:


TING

Linux Academy

A Week With GNOME As My Linux Desktop: What They Get Right & Wrong

Which brings up an important distinction between KDE and Gnome. Gnome feels like a product. It feels like a singular experience. When you use it, it feels like it is complete and that everything you need is at your fingertips. It feel’s like THE Linux desktop in the same way that Windows or OS X have THE desktop experience: what you need is there and it was all written by the same guys working on the same team towards the same goal.

  • I spent the first five days of my week logging into Gnome manually– not turning on automatic login. On night of the fifth day I got annoyed with having to login by hand and so I went into the User Manager and turned on automatic login. The next time I logged in I got a prompt: “Your keychain was not unlocked. Please enter your password to unlock your keychain.” That was when I realized something… Gnome had been automatically unlocking my keychain—my wallet in KDE speak– every time I logged in via GDM. It was only when I bypassed GDM’s login that Gnome had to step in and make me do it manually.
    • it was at that moment that I realized it was such a simple thing that made the desktop feel so much more like it was working WITH ME. When I log into KDE via SDDM? Before the splash screen is even finished loading there is a window popping up over top the splash animation– thereby disrupting the splash screen– prompting me to unlock my KDE wallet or GPG keyring.

    • Software Managers! Something that has seen a lot of push in recent years and will likely only see a bigger push in the months to come. Unfortunately, it’s another area where KDE was so close… and then fell on its face right at the finish line.

    • Gnome Software is probably my new favorite software center, minus one gripe which I will get to in a bit. Muon, I wanted to like you. I really did. But you are a design nightmare. When the VDG was drawing up plans for you (mockup below), you looked pretty slick.

    • Then someone got around to coding you and doing your actual UI, and I can only guess they were drunk while they did it.


  • Which brings up an important distinction between KDE and Gnome. Gnome feels like a product. It feels like a singular experience. When you use it, it feels like it is complete and that everything you need is at your fingertips. It feel’s like THE Linux desktop in the same way that Windows or OS X have THE desktop experience: what you need is there and it was all written by the same guys working on the same team towards the same goal.

  • KDE doesn’t feel like cohesive experience. KDE doesn’t feel like it has a direction its moving in, it doesn’t feel like a full experience. KDE feels like its a bunch of pieces that are moving in a bunch of different directions, that just happen to have a shared toolkit beneath them.

  • I know the KDE developers know design matters, that is WHY the Visual Design Group exists, but it feels like they aren’t using the VDG to their fullest.

  • Will I still use Gnome after this week? Probably not, no. Gnome still trying to force a work flow on me that I don’t want to follow or abide by, I feel less productive when I’m using it because it doesn’t follow my paradigm.


DigitalOcean

openSUSE Follow Up

onelostuser writes:

I don’t get why Noah and Chris are puzzled by what SuSE and OpenSuSE intend to do. The new distro will be to SLE what CentOS is to RHEL.
There will be Tumbleweed, the bleeding edge, always rolling distro that will be in much better shape than Rawhide because OpenSuSE actually expects people to use it as a desktop OS as opposed to “it’s rawhide so it’s borked”.

Then there will be OpenSUSE 42, based on the SLE sources. People will be able to use it such as others do with CentOS and I would be amazed if OpenSuSE and SuSE don’t make it extremely easy to switch from 42 to the enterprise version where they can sell people support on a subscription basis.

To me, it looks like a very smart move.

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